Wednesday, July 5, 2017

11: U.K. (1978)

Jump to Musical Analysis:

     In late 1977, drummer Bill Bruford, singer/bassist John Wetton and guitarist Robert Fripp, all ex-members of King Crimson (which had last recorded in 1974), attempted to reunite as a new band, "The League of Gentlemen". However, Fripp backed out, so instead Bruford and Wetton conscripted Allan Holdsworth (who had just recorded on Bruford's "Feels Good To Me" album) and keyboardist/violinist Eddie Jobson (Roxy Music, Frank Zappa) to form an alternate supergroup, ultimately named "U.K." (since their national heritage was the only apparent thing they had in common). In an account from a 1978 "Oor" magazine interview, Bill Bruford describes his role:
     "He’s been a favorite musician friend of mine for a long time, and since Fripp eventually didn’t join us, I immediately thought of Allan. In fact, just as I was about to call him, he made a phone call to me and said, 'Say, Bill, we should form a group together. Do you know a good bass player, a good keyboard player and a good singer?'  As you can imagine, the deal was quickly concluded, and I'm very happy to work with Allan. Not only is he playing marvelously well, but also because, with him, UK is a fresh new band, not just a new King Crimson."
                                                               - Magazine "Oor" (Netherlands, Feb. 8, 1978)
     After about two months of rehearsal, their debut album was recorded over six weeks at the end of 1977 and the beginning of 1978. U.K.'s songs were composed in sections and then assembled into songs in the studio (in a fashion similar to that used for Bruford's "Feels Good To Me" album).  Jobson's old boss, Frank Zappa, stopped by to hear the fruits of their labors and was hugely impressed (Zappa would later become publicly quite vocal about his appreciation of Allan's guitar prowess).  Allan had somewhat mixed feelings about the process however:
     "We started with bass and drums mainly. That's a thing I'd never done. I don't like that way of working at all. We're going to do it different next time. With Bill and U.K. the rehearsals had almost nothing to do with what ultimately went on the records. We just played bits and pieces of songs, and they would shake them up and record them. Then we had to try to reproduce those parts live...With U.K., particularly, we had millions of overdubs, and then we had to try to decide who could play what parts live because one guy doesn't have four hands, and so on. Again it comes back to the magical quality of interplay between band members...But the closer we came to recording, the more sterile the music sounded..."
     Allan's compositional parts for the song "Nevermore", however, seemed to have survived the process:
     "I already had that song written, but it was an instrumental. I think John Wetton wrote the lyrics. I was doing some layered guitar things in those days and we just took the guitar parts and he sang them as opposed to me playing them. I used a distorted sound, all recorded on separate tracks. I wouldn't need to take that approach if I was to harmonize or write vocal melodies. It was just something we tried. I think that song turned out OK." (4, 7, 60)
from UK - Ultimate Collector's Edition (2016)
     The band toured England in the late spring and the U.S. during the summer and early fall of 1978.  Probably one of the most notable events of this tour was when Allan met upcoming star guitarist Eddie Van Halen.  The two guitarists crossed paths at a couple festival gigs and this brief meeting would pay dividends for Allan several years later.
     “I first met Eddie when I was working with U.K. We did some tour dates with Van Halen in the Midwest. He's great - innovative, a natural musician. I relate to him - there are not many musicians I've felt that way about, whatever the musical idiom.” (16)
     Below, in a December 1979 interview with Jas Obrecht (and partly from the resulting April 1980 Guitar Player article), a 23-year-old Eddie Van Halen describes his awe for the band members, as well as U.K.'s less-than-warm audience reception:
     "Allan Holdsworth -- that guy is bad! He’s fantastic - I love him. He’s got a rock sound. I love his solo in “In the Dead of the Night” on the U.K. album. I love the solo in “Hell’s Bells” on One of a Kind. Bill Bruford plays hot on that album. Holdsworth is the best in my book....U.K. opened for us last year for a few shows. And I never heard of the band U.K. Here we are in Reno, I’m sitting here tuning up, and all of a sudden [in a reverent voice], “Is that Bill Bruford? Whoa!” All of a sudden I got the chills. I was freakin’ out. All of a sudden Allan Holdsworth walks in. I’m going, “My God! These guys are opening for us? These guys are veterans!” I mean, they’ve been through it.
     "They played before us, and they bombed. People hated them. But I’m standing there with tears in my eyes, just getting off, trippin’. It was so good. But it’s like they’re 'artists' – “I’m playing my art, and I don’t care if you like it or not” – that type of thing, which I think is a real bad attitude. Music is for people. It’s not for yourself. If it is, sit in your room and play it. But if you’re gonna play it for people, you better play something that they’re gonna want to hear, instead of walking up there and pretending like you’re so good and beyond your audience. That’s what they were doing, playing all this off-beat stuff which, to an average person, sounds like mistakes (even though - because I’m a musician - I get off on it and like it and understand what they’re doing). But they bombed, and I couldn’t believe it."
     Van Halen's criticisms about the band's intentions come across as a bit naive, but in later years Allan would also describe touring with U.K. as a frustrating experience - even creatively:
     "Just before I left the band, I used to daydream an awful lot while we were playing all those bits onstage; you know, thinking about a nice pint of beer or something. I was easily distracted. And because I couldn't associate all those bits - they didn't form any kind of cohesive picture in my mind - (they weren't) real compositions like violin variations, but bits and pieces thrown together... I wouldn't know if it was tune 3 or tune 6 or what...(also) they wanted me to play the same solos. I said, 'Sorry, no can do.' Once a solo is done, try something else. In fact I really get worried if my live solos sound like the ones on the records." (7, 10)
     Bill corroborates this incident in his usual wry tone (from his autobiography):
     "The difference between Eddie (Jobson) and Allan was, I thought, succinctly drawn when, one day, Eddie asked Allan, one of the best improvisers in the world, for whom improvising was meat and drink, to perform the same solos nightly that he had performed on the preceding album, presumably in the interest of product consistency. Allan's mind utterly failed to compute the origin of this request, so bizarre did it seem." (90)
     Allan and Bill's membership in U.K. ultimately led to a "Brexit" (apologies), as they were soon "fired" by Jobson and Wetton. Bill describes Wetton giving him "the conversation" near the end of the band's summer 1978 tour (and after a massively-attended August 8th open-air free show):
     "After a spectacular night at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia in front of a 50,000 crowd, John announced to me that he and Eddie were going to take the thing in a more pop direction, of which Allan would not be a part, and did I want to continue with them? I declined, and said I would continue my own thing with Allan...We struggled through a few more dates in the autumn, but for me, UK was over. John eventually went on to the platinum-selling Asia, and Allan and I went back to London to begin work on my second album, 'One Of A Kind'." (77, 90) 
from UK - Ultimate Collector's Edition (2016)
U.K.: Musical Analysis
     U.K.'s first album sounds exactly like the sum of its hugely talented parts.  However one might also sense that Allan's prodigious talent for more exploratory improvisation was being somewhat leashed.  His solo in the famous first cut is one of his greatest moments, but for the remainder of the album, Wetton and Jobson remind us that this is no "Lifetime".  From a keyboard standpoint, the album is notable for being the first to feature the Yamaha CS80 polyphonic synth (the first with polyphonic aftertouch), and "Nevermore" takes a detour through the circuits of Trident Studios' ARP 2500 modular synth. Eddie Jobson is spotlighted in these electronic odysseys, as well as on a couple of electric violin solos. Bruford also began using pitched roto-toms in his kit starting from these sessions, and Wetton wasted no opportunity to layer his vocal tracks over several harmony choruses.  The result is actually a pretty interesting album, but also bursting at the seams.  One other thing which makes this album a little awkward, is that the "joins" in Allan's overdubbed guitar solos are a bit more apparent here than in other recordings (at least to me). This is probably another sign of the "sterility" Allan spoke of regarding the recording process.

"U.K." (1978)
Recorded and Mixed Dec 1977-Jan 1978)
Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
Allan Holdsworth – electric guitar
Eddie Jobson – keyboards, electronics, violin
John Wetton – bass, vocals
Trk Title Dur Song Breakdown
1 In The Dead of Night
I
5:38 (Eddie Jobson, John Wetton)
This track was released as a single, and Allan's liquid solo on here probably turned alot of heads, especially in America.  Eddie Van Halen and Alex Lifeson have mentioned this song's solo as among their favorites (Yngwie Malmsteen even covered this tune). The transition figure is probably one of the catchiest hooks ever written for a "21/8" rhythm (actually 2 bars of 4/4 with a 5/8 turnaround).  
0:00: Syncopated pedal groove in 7/4 joined by synth riff, power chord cadence as synth riff modulates.
0:28: 7/4 grace-note groove anchored by bass and synth riff, joined by 1st verse.
1:00: Chorus, opening pedal groove w synth riff.
1:14: Transition "hook" groove (4/4, 4/4, 5/8) w synth riff, accented cadence with synth arpeggios.
1:37: Opening pedal groove, power chord cadence.
1:53: 2nd verse w. 7/4 grace-note bass groove, chorus, pedal groove.
2:29: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w synth arpeggios.
2:52: Opening pedal groove, 7/4 grace-note bass groove (no synth riff).
3:08: Allan's most famous guitar solo (in 2 sequences) over 7/4 grace-note bass groove (w. reverse piano/modulating synth accents).
4:31: 2nd half guitar solo ends as synth riff and chorus begins, opening pedal groove.
4:45: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w arpeggios, pedal groove.
2 In The Dead of Night
II:
By The Light of Day
4:32 (Jobson, Wetton)
This synth-heavy track (mostly in 5/8) features an electric violin solo but no guitar.
0:00: Arpeggiated/filtered synth layers joined by vocal 1st verse and cymbals.
0:41: Chorus (theme from "Dead of Night" Part I chorus), 2nd verse.
1:32: Chorus, drums enter, followed by violin solo over relaxed 5/8 groove and chorus harmony.
2:29: 3rd verse (harmonized), modulating upwards.
2:50: Verse melody in synth textures and snare rolls, drums.
3:51: Synth textures develop.
3 In The Dead of Night
III:
Presto Vivace and Reprise
2:58 (Jobson, Wetton)
A long Bruford-like line ("tricky-dick stuff") opens this track, leading to a reprise of themes from "Dead of Night" Part I.
0:00: Uptempo drum groove, winding, staccato synth line with drum/bass accents.
1:01: Part I pedal groove and synth riff reprise, power chord cadence.
1:28: Part I grace-note groove (w. vocal verse), chorus, pedal groove.
2:04: Part I transition "hook" groove, accented cadence with synth arpeggios, final accents.
4 Thirty Years 8:05 (Wetton, Jobson, Bill Bruford)
This nicely-structured piece opens with some acoustic guitar textures as well as some "Yes"-like melodic elements. The second half becomes a bit more funky and Allan delivers a pretty uncompromising solo (later followed by a very melodic one). The song lyric is about a 30-year old woman who has seen life pass her by.
0:00: Pastoral synth textures joined by acoustic guitar ornaments.
0:53: 1st verse (vocals/synth), rising harmony cadence.
1:34: Acoustic guitar ornaments resume over synth pedal.
1:52: 2nd verse, rising harmony cadence, modulating bridge.
3:20 Transition: Drums enter with mid-tempo groove with synth head melody, developing.
3:53: Staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents, synth solo.
4:50: Staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents, guitar solo.
5:37: Staccato guitar riff (percussion ornaments), joined by vocal and brass-synth accents, cadence.
6:12: 3rd verse with broad, mid-tempo groove, rising harmony cadence (accented).
6:48: Transition reprise in half tempo with guitar taking synth head, ending synth textures.
5 Alaska 4:45 (Jobson)
The highlight of this tune is the dramatic synth intro, but it has a nice, pounding follow up section as well. The ending is frenzied precision.
0:00: Synthesizer overture.
2:43: Accented fanfare theme with staccato synth accents and guitar lead motif.
3:07: Synth/power chord theme.
3:37: Fanfare theme, power chord theme, fanfare theme.
4:23: Churning rhythmic cadence, segues directly to "Time To Kill".
6 Time To Kill 4:55 (Wetton, Jobson, Bruford)
This energetic song features some beautiful harmony guitar tracks and a lengthy violin solo over a wide-ranging rhythmic landscape.  The vocal chorus is catchy as well.
0:00: Vocal harmony leads to up-tempo 1st verse over upwards modulating pedal, joined by harmonized guitar.
0:29: Syncopated guitar-driven cadence with staccato synth and fervent vocals.
0:44: 2nd verse (also with overdubbed harmony guitar).
1:11: Chorus with harmony vocals/organ/hand claps.
1:44: Rhythmic ensemble cadence, pedal accents under processed violin solo, accented groove modulates (harmonically and rhythmically), developing as violin solo continues.
4:18: Chorus with harmony vocals/organ, rhythmic ensemble cadence.
7 Nevermore 8:09 (Allan Holdsworth, Jobson, Wetton)
Allan repurposed an original song of his ("Sunday") to fit Jobson and Wetton's parts.  This cut also has rich harmony guitar layers and a peppy vocal chorus (very 80's in fact). Allan and Jobson have a nice "electric duel".  The interlude in the second half was created with Trident Studios' ARP 2500 modular synth.
0:00: Acoustic guitar duet prelude.
0:31: Melody on acoustic guitar, supported by synth, cymbals (this part would later be renamed "Sunday" and used as a jazz head with Gordon Beck).
0:57: Bass pedal pulses lead to 1st verse (with guitar following melody line), punctuating harmony guitar accents.
1:43: Mid-tempo chorus groove with harmony vocals.
1:57: Bass pedal pulses (with mid-tempo groove) with synth solo.
2:11: Bass pulses and 2nd verse with piano following melody line, punctuating accents.
2:28: Mid-tempo chorus groove with harmony vocals.
2:52: Arpeggio motif on synth joined by guitar and synth solo trades.
4:30: Majestic bridge groove with broad vocal harmonies.
5:18: Electronic ARP synthesizer interlude.
6:40: Gentle vocals lead to drum ornaments and slow accented groove.
7:08: "Sunday" melody theme reprise with lead guitar line, synth oscillation texture.
8 Mental Medication 7:26 (Holdsworth, Bruford, Jobson)
The opening guitar parts are very characteristic of Allan's developing comping style (and which would fully flower in "I.O.U."). The rest of the song is chock full of schizophrenic mood-swings as far as grooves, textures and cadences (which may be why the band never played it live).
0:00: Clean guitar figures ("sweetened"), joined by main vocal melody (violin and synth ornaments).
1:15: Mid-tempo vocal groove A with piano ornaments and accented cadences.
1:46: Scalar interlude based on rising/falling figures (with piano).
2:03: Mid-tempo vocal groove A with accented cadences (no piano ornaments).
2:35: Variations of scalar interlude in new plodding rhythm/tempo with a brief guitar solo, ending in brief reprise of opening figures in harmony guitar lines.
3:17: Falling scalar run leads to accented up-tempo mutant-funk groove and 2nd brief guitar solo (piano ornaments), scalar figures, accented groove.
4:08: Cadence to more open groove (variation of groove A) featuring synth lead line.
4:32: Accented synth/bass pulses lead to accented groove again with violin solo (and scattered clean guitar ornaments), variation of groove A, accented groove.
5:41: Cadence to variation of groove A, harmony guitar cadence.
6:07: Main vocal melody over harmonized guitar and snare rolls, developed into a descending harmony cadence, fading synth textures.

(1 page excerpt from Guitar magazine, April 1980)
      During this time Allan played his Dick Knight-built custom Strat with “chiselled in” Dimarzio-copy Gibson PAF pick-ups - not so much for the "Gibson sound", but mainly because the humbucking pickups reduced amp hum. He was very fond of the Strat tremolo bar system, since the strings did not get "caught up" on a bridge and go out of tune (as they did in the Gibson Firebird's vibrola). He still played through the Marshall 50W and a pair of 4x12 cabinets. On the album he also used a hollow-body Ibanez Gibson L5 copy for the acoustic parts. On one U.K. promotional video he can also be seen playing a Gibson Firebird 7.

http://www.petecornish.co.uk/customunits.html
 The U.K. Ultimate Collector's Edition
     Eddie Jobson's recent reissue of U.K.'s discography in the "Ultimate Collector's Edition" (on its last pressing as of this writing, and recommended) included three live sets from Allan's time with the band. This tour ambitiously included five new songs which were not heard on the debut album. The new songs feature some nice, edgy leads from Allan, but at the same time the songs may seem to be a bit "over-structured" (in my opinion).  This box also includes a fascinating version of the first U.K. album mixed without the vocal tracks.

Live in Boston
Paradise Club, July 11, 1978

This show is notable for including 3 new songs:
"The Only Thing She Needs", "Carrying No Cross", and "Caesar's Palace Blues".
Trk Title Dur Song Breakdown
1 Alaska 3:41 0:00: Synthesizer overture.
1:40: Accented fanfare theme with staccato synth accents and guitar lead motif.
2:05: Synth/power chord theme.
2:36: Fanfare theme, power chord theme, fanfare theme.
3:24: Churning rhythmic cadence, segues directly to "Time To Kill".
2 Time To Kill 5:09 0:00: Vocal harmony leads to up-tempo 1st verse over upwards modulating pedal, joined by guitar motif.
0:29: Syncopated guitar-driven cadence with staccato synth and fervent vocals.
0:44: 2nd verse (power chords, ornaments).
1:11: Chorus with harmony vocals.
1:44: Rhythmic ensemble cadence, pedal accents under processed violin solo, accented groove modulates (harmonically and rhythmically), developing as violin solo continues.
4:21: Chorus with harmony vocals, rhythmic ensemble cadence.
3 The Only Thing She Needs 7:21 0:00: Accented ("creeping") riff, joined by synth counter-figure, turning into full creeping groove.
0:51: Groove based on zigzag rhythmic figure and pedal accents, fanfare cadence.
1:26: Creeping groove, zigzag theme with 1st verse, fanfare cadence.
2:19: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
2:40: Opening creeping texture, synth counter, zigzag theme with 2nd verse, fanfare cadence.
3:48: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
4:09: Guitar solo over half-tempo, modulating pedal groove.
5:25: Allan's solo becomes comping figures as groove becomes a loose funky version of creeping theme, rising organ harmony with continued guitar solo and increased energy, ending in heavy chord accents.
4 Carrying No Cross 10:01 0:00: Fanfare swell leads to synth-driven ballad vocal with scattered snare accents.
1:23: Clean guitar ornaments over a light groove.
1:48: B vocal section leading to 2nd verse.
2:33: Rapid bass pulses lead to a mid-tempo, modulating pedal groove, punctuated by rhythmic figures.
4:08: Light groove with synth solo featured (some electric guitar comping), cadencing and modulating.
5:25: Guitar briefly joins synth lead in a unison melodic theme.
5:44: Stuttering bass-driven groove with loose guitar/synth ornaments, guitar eventually joins bass.
6:54: Piano ostinato with percussion textures leads mutant funk groove, rhythmic figures/cadences.
7:50: Modulating pedal groove reprise, light organ-driven groove with guitar solo featured.
8:50: 3rd verse vocal with scattered snare accents, final chord.
5 Thirty Years 8:40 This version features a slightly extended guitar solo.
0:00: Pastoral synth textures joined by acoustic guitar ornaments.
1:00: 1st verse (vocals/synth), rising harmony cadence.
1:39: Acoustic guitar ornaments resume over synth pedal.
1:59: 2nd verse, rising harmony cadence, modulating bridge.
3:21 Transition: Drums enter with mid-tempo groove with synth head melody, developing.
3:54: Staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents, synth solo, staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents.
5:04: Guitar solo over staccato riff, continuing over mid-tempo transition groove.
6:24: Staccato guitar riff (drum ornaments), joined by vocal and brass-synth accents, cadence.
7:01: 3rd verse with broad, mid-tempo groove, rising harmony cadence (accented).
7:40: Transition reprise in half tempo with guitar solo based on head, ending synth textures.
6 By The Light Of Day 1:21 This version starts near the end of the album version but has some added guitar ornaments.
0:00: Synth textures develop theme with the help of guitar lead line.
0:32: Final synth cadence, snare roll.
7 Presto Vivace 1:17 This version cuts off just before the Part 1 reprise (which would be replaced by Part 1 proper).
0:00: Uptempo drum groove, winding, staccato synth line with drum/bass accents.
8 In The Dead Of Night 6:33 0:00: Syncopated pedal groove in 7/4 joined by synth riff, power chord cadence as synth riff modulates.
0:29: 7/4 grace-note pedal groove anchored by bass and synth riff, joined by 1st verse.
1:02: Chorus with synth line, opening pedal groove w synth riff.
1:17: Transition "hook" groove (4/4, 4/4, 5/8) w. synth riff (on electric piano), accented cadence with synth arpeggios.
1:40: Opening pedal groove, power chord cadence.
1:57: 2nd verse w. 7/4 grace-note bass groove, chorus, pedal groove.
2:34: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w synth arpeggios.
2:57: Opening pedal groove, 7/4 grace-note bass groove (no synth riff).
3:13: Allan's guitar solo over 7/4 grace-note pedal bass groove (w. textural, modulating synth accents).
4:38: Guitar solo ends as chorus enters, opening pedal groove.
5:04: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w arpeggios, final accented cadence/rave-up.
9 Caesar's Palace Blues 4:29 This cheerful romp in 5/4 has Allan adding some artificial harmonics to his part, but unfortunately doesn't feature a guitar solo.
0:00: Mid-tempo, lilting/syncopated synth riff/melody with counter guitar accents, developed, rhythmic cadence.
1:10: 1st verse over syncopated riff, cadence with violin in top line.
1:44: 2nd verse with syncopated riff, cadence with violin in top line.
2:39: Distorted violin solo over syncopated groove riff, bass modulates and develops into a broader groove.
4:03: Rhythmic cadence leads to accents, final cadence.



Live in Philadelphia
Penn's Landing, August 8, 1978

This show is notable for including two new songs which would later be rerecorded for Bruford's "One Of A Kind":
"Forever Until Sunday", and "Sahara of Snow Pt 1 & 2". 
(Right after this show is when Bill Bruford was informed that Allan was out.)
Trk Title Dur Song Breakdown
1 Alaska 3:39 0:11: Synthesizer overture.
1:40: Accented fanfare theme with staccato synth accents and guitar lead motif.
2:05: Synth/power chord theme, fanfare theme, power chord theme, fanfare theme.
3:22: Churning rhythmic cadence, segues directly to "Time To Kill".
2 Time To Kill 5:23 0:00: Vocal harmony leads to up-tempo 1st verse over upwards modulating pedal, joined by guitar motif.
0:29: Syncopated guitar-driven cadence with staccato synth and fervent vocals.
0:45: 2nd verse (power chords, ornaments), chorus with harmony vocals.
1:43: Rhythmic ensemble cadence, pedal accents under processed violin solo, accented groove modulates (harmonically and rhythmically), developing as violin solo continues.
4:15: Chorus with harmony vocals, rhythmic ensemble cadence.
3 The Only Thing She Needs 7:21 0:00: Accented ("creeping") riff, joined by synth counter-figure, turning into full creeping groove.
0:50: Groove based on zigzag rhythmic figure and pedal accents, fanfare cadence.
1:23: Creeping groove, zigzag theme with 1st verse, fanfare cadence.
2:15: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
2:35: Opening creeping texture, synth counter, zigzag theme with 2nd verse, fanfare cadence.
3:41: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
4:01: Guitar solo over half-tempo, modulating pedal groove.
5:15: Allan's solo becomes comping figures as groove becomes a loose funky version of creeping theme, rising organ harmony with continued guitar solo and increased energy, ending in heavy chord accents.
4 Carrying No Cross 10:04 0:00: Fanfare swell leads to synth-driven ballad vocal with scattered snare accents.
1:24: Clean guitar ornaments over a light groove, B vocal section leading to 2nd verse.
2:33: Rapid bass pulses lead to a mid-tempo, modulating pedal groove, punctuated by rhythmic figures.
4:08: Light groove with synth solo featured (some electric guitar comping), cadencing and modulating.
5:24: Guitar briefly joins synth lead in a unison melodic theme.
5:42: Stuttering bass-driven pedal groove under synth solo, rhythmic cadence.
6:56: Piano ostinato with percussion textures leads to mutant funk groove, rhythmic figures/cadences.
7:47: Modulating pedal groove reprise, light organ-driven groove with guitar solo featured.
8:46: 3rd verse vocal with scattered snare accents, final chord.
5 Forever Until Sunday 6:02 This song would later be re-arranged for Bruford's "One Of A Kind". This early live version has a guitar intro instead of the Bruford synth intro.  The ending sequence is a bit reminiscent of Bruford's "Adios a La Pasada".
0:00: Clean arpeggiated guitar figures, joined by violin/bass head melody in a slow groove.
1:28: Electric violin solo over modulating groove variations, violin returns to head.
2:28: Mid-tempo groove with insistent fuzz bass, synth power chords leading to synth theme, cadence.
3:16: Syncopated heavy guitar riff with accented piano, leading to guitar solo supported by bubbling bass and synth theme, cadence.
4:07: Head (reprise) with guitar in lead line, developed into a lyrical guitar solo, noble end cadence ("thanks to the crew", etc).
6 Thirty Years 8:08 0:00: Pastoral synth textures joined by acoustic guitar ornaments.
0:43: 1st verse (vocals/synth), rising harmony cadence, acoustic guitar ornaments resume over synth pedal.
1:38: 2nd verse, rising harmony cadence, modulating bridge.
2:57: Transition: Drums/fuzz bass enter with mid-tempo groove with synth head melody, developing.
3:28: Staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents, synth solo, staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents.
4:25: Guitar solo over staccato riff, continuing over mid-tempo transition groove.
5:52: Staccato guitar riff (drum ornaments), joined by vocal and brass-synth accents, cadence.
6:29: 3rd verse with broad, mid-tempo groove, rising harmony cadence (accented).
7:06: Transition reprise in half tempo with guitar solo based on head, ending synth textures/snare roll.
7 By The Light Of Day 1:14 0:00: Drums lead to synth textures, theme developed with the help of guitar lead line.
0:33: Final synth cadence, snare roll.
8 Presto Vivace 1:23 0:00: Snare roll into uptempo drum groove, winding, staccato synth line with drum/bass accents.
9 In The Dead Of Night 7:31 0:00: Syncopated pedal groove in 7/4 joined by synth riff, power chord cadence as synth riff modulates.
0:28: 7/4 grace-note pedal groove anchored by bass and synth riff, joined by 1st verse.
1:01: Chorus with synth line, opening pedal groove w synth riff.
1:15: Transition "hook" groove (4/4, 4/4, 5/8) w. synth riff, accented cadence with synth arpeggios.
1:38: Opening pedal groove, power chord cadence/modulation with guitar ornaments.
1:54: 2nd verse w. 7/4 grace-note bass groove, chorus, pedal groove.
2:31: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w synth arpeggios, opening pedal groove, 7/4 grace-note bass groove (no synth riff).
3:09: Allan's guitar solo over 7/4 grace-note pedal bass groove (w. textural, modulating synth accents).
4:43: Guitar solo ends as chorus enters, opening pedal groove, transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w arpeggios, final accented cadence/rave-up. (audience clapping)
10 The Sahara Of Snow 9:39 This song would also later be re-arranged for Bruford's "One Of A Kind" album (with added layers of marimba). In this early version the guitar takes more lead spots. 
0:00: (Part 1) Swelling synth/percussion textures with abstract figures in clean guitar/fuzz bass, percussion groove surfaces as a mid-tempo vamp.
2:26: 7/8 drum groove based on piano vamp, modulating with guitar solo.
3:08: Lead guitar melody enters over a churning groove, bridge cadence.
3:55: Pulsating synth interlude with fuzz bass ornaments.
4:29: 7/8 piano groove reprise with more guitar solo, lead guitar melody reprise, bridge cadence.
5:44: (Part 2) Groove based on even (hammered) accents, joined by clipped rhythm guitar figure, piano accents.
6:32: Guitar solo over accented groove (modulating rhythm).
7:45: Lead guitar melody reprise, developed.
8:52: Final rave-up.
11 Caesar's Palace Blues 5:14 In this version the accented guitar part more closely follows the synth line.
0:00: Mid-tempo, lilting/syncopated synth riff/melody with guitar accents, developed, rhythmic cadence.
1:07: 1st verse over syncopated riff, chorus cadence with violin in top line.
1:40: 2nd verse with syncopated riff, chorus cadence with violin in top line.
2:31: Processed violin solo over syncopated groove riff, bass modulates and develops into a broader groove.
3:53: Rhythmic cadence leads to accents, final cadence.



Live in Cleveland, Ohio
Agora Ballroom, September 18, 1978

At this point Allan and Bill had already been fired from (or quit) the band and were only playing for contractual reasons.  However this didn't prevent the band from delivering a great performance.  Ironically, they sound more like a cohesive band here than ever before, despite the behind the scenes drama.
Trk Title Dur Song Breakdown
1 Alaska 4:13 0:00: Synthesizer overture.
2:13: Accented fanfare theme with staccato synth accents and guitar lead motif.
2:38: Synth/power chord theme, fanfare theme, etc.
3:56: Churning rhythmic cadence, segues directly to "Time To Kill".
2 Time To Kill 5:44 0:00: Vocal harmony leads to up-tempo 1st verse over upwards modulating pedal, joined by guitar motif.
0:29: Syncopated guitar-driven cadence with staccato synth and fervent vocals.
0:44: 2nd verse (power chords, ornaments), chorus with harmony vocals.
1:43: Rhythmic ensemble cadence, pedal accents under processed violin solo, accented groove modulates (harmonically and rhythmically), developing as violin solo continues.
4:15: Chorus with harmony vocals, rhythmic ensemble cadence.
4:52: Applause.
3 The Only Thing She Needs 7:30 0:00: Accented ("creeping") riff (clean guitar), joined by synth counter-figure, turning into full creeping groove with crunchy guitar.
0:51: Groove based on zigzag rhythmic figure and pedal accents, fanfare cadence.
1:25: Creeping crunch groove, zigzag theme with 1st verse, fanfare cadence.
2:17: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
2:37: Opening creeping texture, synth counter, zigzag theme with 2nd verse, fanfare cadence.
3:45: Organ cadence, falling accented pedal.
4:05: Guitar solo over half-tempo, modulating pedal groove.
5:20: Bass featured as groove becomes a loose, funky version of creeping theme.
6:14: Rising organ harmony with continued guitar solo and increased energy, ending in heavy chord accents.
4 Carrying No Cross 10:24 0:00: Fanfare swell leads to synth-driven ballad vocal with scattered snare accents.
1:25: Clean guitar ornaments over a light groove.
1:52: B vocal section leading to 2nd verse.
2:35: Rapid bass pulses lead to a mid-tempo, modulating pedal groove, punctuated by rhythmic figures.
4:09: Light groove with synth solo featured (some guitar comping), cadencing and modulating.
5:26: Guitar briefly joins synth lead in a unison melodic theme.
5:46: Stuttering bass/guitar-driven groove with wailing synth solo, rhythmic cadence.
6:59: Uptempo piano ostinato with percussion textures leads to mutant funk groove, rhythmic figures/cadences.
7:51: Modulating pedal groove reprise, light organ-driven groove with guitar solo featured.
8:50: 3rd verse vocal with cowbell/scattered drum accents, final chord.
9:58 Applause.
5 Forever Until Sunday 5:36 0:00: Clean, arpeggiated guitar figures, joined by violin/bass head melody in a slow groove.
1:18: Electric violin solo over modulating groove variations (clean guitar comping), violin returns to head.
2:27: Mid-tempo groove with insistent fuzz bass, synth power chords leading to synth theme, cadence.
3:15: Syncopated heavy guitar riff with staccato piano, leading to guitar solo supported by galloping bass and synth theme, cadence.
4:06: Head (reprise) with guitar in lead line, developed into a lyrical guitar solo, dramatic end cadence/rave-up.
6 Thirty Years 8:31 0:00: Pastoral synth textures (no guitar ornaments this time).
0:58: 1st verse (vocals/synth), rising harmony cadence, synth interlude.
1:59: 2nd verse, rising harmony cadence, modulating bridge.
3:22 Transition: Drums enter with mid-tempo groove with synth head melody/electric guitar comping, developing.
3:53: Staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents, synth solo, staccato guitar riff/brass-synth accents.
4:59: Guitar solo over staccato riff, continuing over mid-tempo transition groove.
6:16: Staccato guitar riff (drum ornaments), joined by vocal chorus and brass-synth accents, cadence.
6:52: 3rd verse with broad, mid-tempo groove, rising harmony cadence (accented).
7:29: Transition reprise in half tempo with guitar solo based on head, ending synth textures.
7 By The Light Of Day 1:28 0:00: Drum groove with synth head, developed with guitar lead line.
0:35: Final synth cadence, snare roll.
8 Presto Vivace 1:21 0:00: Snare roll into uptempo drum groove, winding, staccato synth line with drum/bass accents.
9 In The Dead Of Night 7:08 Fittingly, Allan's solo here is the longest of all four versions covered here.
0:00: Syncopated pedal groove in 7/4 joined by synth riff, power chord cadence as synth riff modulates.
0:28: 7/4 grace-note pedal groove anchored by bass and synth riff (guitar plays with synth), joined by 1st verse.
1:01: Chorus with synth line, opening pedal groove w synth riff.
1:15: Transition "hook" groove (4/4, 4/4, 5/8) w. synth riff, accented cadence with synth arpeggios.
1:38: Opening pedal groove, power chord cadence/modulation with guitar ornaments.
1:54: 2nd verse w. 7/4 grace-note bass groove, chorus, pedal groove.
2:31: Transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w synth arpeggios, opening pedal groove, 7/4 grace-note bass groove (with synth flourishes).
3:09: Allan's guitar solo over 7/4 grace-note pedal bass groove (w. textural, modulating synth accents).
5:14: Guitar solo ends as chorus enters, opening pedal groove, transition "hook" groove, accented cadence w arpeggios, final accented cadence/rave-up.

Next: Bruford - "One Of A Kind" 
Previous Chapter: Bruford - "Feels Good To Me"

The numbers in parentheses after Allan's quotes above refer to sources listed in the Bibliography
For more detailed information on this chapter, see the Annotated Chronology.

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